Glasses Lens Material – Everything you need to know

Glasses Lens Material: Your Ultimate Guide

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Types of Lens Materials | Three Main Materials | Lens coatings and add-ons | Polycarbonate vs Plastic | Best material

There are many types of lens material available on the market today, read on to discover which lens is best for your vision and lifestyle!

There is much more to buying eyeglasses than what first meets the eye. It’s not just choosing the right frame, cool shape, or funky colours. Glasses lens materials also play an important part in picking the right eyewear for you and your vision. 

It may seem like a lot to take in, but this article will guide you through the different qualities of the best glasses lens material!

How many types of lens materials for glasses are there?

There are three main types of lens materials for eyeglasses and sunglasses. Each type of lens material can help correct refractive errors such as nearsightedness, farsightedness, astigmatism, or presbyopia

Before going into the different materials, it can be good to understand the index of refraction. Some materials are categorized by the index of refraction, which indicates how fast light travels through a given material.

Essentially, the higher the refractive index of a material, the slower light moves through it, which results in a more significant bending (refracting) of light rays. With a higher refractive index, less lens material is required to bend light to the same degree as a lens with a lower refractive index. 

In other words, for any eyeglass prescription, a lens made of a material with a high-refractive index will be thinner than a lens made of a material with a lower refractive index.

What are glasses lenses made of? The three main materials

Glass

Glass lenses are among the best glasses lens material. They provide visual clarity and are highly scratch resistant due to their hard surface. 

However, glass lenses are heavy, thick, and have a lower impact resistance. Of all the lens materials for glasses, glass must be specifically treated to comply with impact-resistant regulations and can not always fit in every frame design.

Plastic

Plastic (CR-39) is the standard glasses lens material. Plastic lenses offer great optics and vision correction for refractive errors and block out 80% of UV light. Compared to glass lenses, plastic lenses are lighter and less likely to shatter as easily.

However, CR-39 plastic lenses tend to be thicker than other plastic materials as they have a lower index of refraction.

High-Index

High-index lens materials are the thinnest and lightest of all glasses lenses material. They can be used for stronger prescriptions as they look more aesthetically pleasing with thinner lenses. High-index lenses bend light more efficiently as they have a higher index of refraction.

High-index lenses have superior optics and impact resistance, but these factors can depend on the type of high-index material used – glass or plastic. Like many other lens materials, high-index lenses provide quality UV protection.

Lens coatings and add-ons

Lens coatings can also be an important factor to keep in mind when choosing lens materials for your glasses. 

With high-index lenses or polycarbonate, you’ll want to make sure you add an anti-reflective coating to avoid the lenses reflecting too much light – especially when driving. 

With many lens materials, you can also get a  zFORT® Blue light blocking add-on to help protect your eyes from harmful rays emitted by digital devices. In addition, Photochromic filters can be added to nearly all lens materials. With this, you have a pair of glasses that also function as sunglasses – 2-in-1!

Feel free to read our guide on lens coatings to learn more!

DID YOU KNOW?

Lens materials should be chosen based on your prescription, frames and lifestyle. If you think your lens is missing something, add a coating such as  zFORT® Blue light blocking.

How do I know if my lenses are polycarbonate or plastic?

When shopping for glasses, it can take time to determine the type of lens material you are getting. You will probably ask yourself, what are glasses lenses made of? Hopefully, this article will provide some answers to that question. If you are happy with your current glasses lenses material and are wondering whether they are polycarbonate or plastic, there are a few ways to tell. 

Polycarbonate glasses lenses are thinner than plastic glasses. In addition, they are usually lighter and more impact-resistant than plastic glasses lenses. 

You can shop for premium plastic lenses on SmartBuyGlasses, and if you’re looking for the same thinness as polycarbonate, high-index lenses are also available on the site.

What is the best eyeglass lens material?

To determine what lens material is best for you, you should have an eye test to determine the requirements of your vision correction. You should also always consult your eye doctor first to find the best suitable lens material for your specific vision correction.

Once you have consulted your optician and have your prescription, you should consider the following factors before making your purchase: Comfort, aesthetics, optics, safety, and cost. 

To summarise your options:

  •  Plastic lenses (CR-39) are the most affordable lens material and work better for weaker Rx.
  • Glass lenses are also low-cost but are difficult to pair with certain frame designs and sizes.
  • High index can work best if you want thinner lenses, but they do come at a higher cost.
  • Polycarbonate lenses and Trivex lenses are similar but do present some differences. 

If you wear glasses every day, you’ll want them to fit comfortably, look good and not weigh heavily on your face. Thinner lenses can tick all boxes. Thicker lenses are more noticeable in the frame and tend to be heavier. Thicker lenses are, however, more affordable and suitable for lower vision corrections. 

You can browse through trendy eyewear on our site and find something to accommodate all of your eye needs. If you need more informative advice about how to choose the right glasses, speak to one of our certified online opticians today or visit our Optical Center.

Glasses Lens Material: Your Ultimate Guide

Types of Lens Materials | Three Main Materials | Lens coatings and add-ons | Polycarbonate vs Plastic | Best Material

There are many types of lens material available on the market today, read on to discover which lens is best for your vision and lifestyle!

There is much more to buying eyeglasses than what first meets the eye. It’s not just choosing the right frame, cool shape, or funky colors. Glasses lens materials also play an important part in picking the right eyewear for you and your vision. 

It may seem like a lot to take in, but this article will guide you through the different qualities of the best glasses lens material!

How many types of lens materials for glasses are there?

There are three main types of lens materials for eyeglasses and sunglasses. Each type of lens material can help correct refractive errors such as nearsightednessfarsightednessastigmatism, or presbyopia

Before going into the different materials, it can be good to understand the index of refraction. Some materials are categorized by the index of refraction, which indicates how fast light travels through a given material.

Essentially, the higher the refractive index of a material, the slower light moves through it, which results in a more significant bending (refracting) of light rays. With a higher refractive index, less lens material is required to bend light to the same degree as a lens with a lower refractive index. 

In other words, for any eyeglass prescription, a lens made of a material with a high-refractive index will be thinner than a lens made of a material with a lower refractive index.

What are glasses lenses made of? The three main materials

Glass

Glass lenses are among the best glasses lens material. They provide visual clarity and are highly scratch resistant due to their hard surface. 

However, glass lenses are heavy, thick, and have a lower impact resistance. Of all the lens materials for glasses, glass must be specifically treated to comply with impact-resistant regulations and can not always fit in every frame design.

Plastic

Plastic (CR-39) is the standard glasses lens material. Plastic lenses offer great optics and vision correction for refractive errors and block out 80% of UV light. Compared to glass lenses, plastic lenses are lighter and less likely to shatter as easily.

However, CR-39 plastic lenses tend to be thicker than other plastic materials as they have a lower index of refraction.

High-Index

High-index lens materials are the thinnest and lightest of all glasses lenses material. They can be used for stronger prescriptions as they look more aesthetically pleasing with thinner lenses. High-index lenses bend light more efficiently as they have a higher index of refraction.

High-index lenses have superior optics and impact resistance, but these factors can depend on the type of high-index material used – glass or plastic. Like many other lens materials, high-index lenses provide quality UV protection.

Lens coatings and add-ons

Lens coatings can also be an important factor to keep in mind when choosing lens materials for your glasses. 

With high-index lenses or polycarbonate, you’ll want to make sure you add an anti-reflective coating to avoid the lenses reflecting too much light – especially when driving. 

With many lens materials, you can also get a  zFORT® Blue light blocking add-on to help protect your eyes from harmful rays emitted by digital devices. In addition, Photochromic filters can be added to nearly all lens materials. With this, you have a pair of glasses that also function as sunglasses – 2-in-1!

Feel free to read our guide on lens coatings to learn more!

DID YOU KNOW?
Lens materials should be chosen based on your prescription, frames and lifestyle. If you think your lens is missing something, add a coating such as zFORT® Blue light blocking.

How do I know if my lenses are polycarbonate or plastic?

When shopping for glasses, it can take time to determine the type of lens material you are getting. You will probably ask yourself, what are glasses lenses made of? Hopefully, this article will provide some answers to that question. If you are happy with your current glasses lenses material and are wondering whether they are polycarbonate or plastic, there are a few ways to tell. 

Polycarbonate glasses lenses are thinner than plastic glasses. In addition, they are usually lighter and more impact-resistant than plastic glasses lenses. 

You can shop for premium plastic lenses on SmartBuyGlasses, and if you’re looking for the same thinness as polycarbonate, high-index lenses are also available on the site.

What is the best eyeglass lens material?

To determine what lens material is best for you, you should have an eye test to determine the requirements of your vision correction. You should also always consult your eye doctor first to find the best suitable lens material for your specific vision correction.

Once you have consulted your optician and have your prescription, you should consider the following factors before making your purchase: Comfort, aesthetics, optics, safety, and cost. 

To summarise your options

  •  Plastic lenses (CR-39) are the most affordable lens material and work better for weaker Rx.
  • Glass lenses are also low-cost but are difficult to pair with certain frame designs and sizes.
  • High index can work best if you want thinner lenses, but they do come at a higher cost.
  • Polycarbonate lenses and Trivex lenses are similar but do present some differences. 

 

If you wear glasses every day, you’ll want them to fit comfortably, look good and not weigh heavily on your face. Thinner lenses can tick all boxes. Thicker lenses are more noticeable in the frame and tend to be heavier. Thicker lenses are, however, more affordable and suitable for lower vision corrections. 

You can browse through trendy eyewear on our site and find something to accommodate all of your eye needs. If you need more informative advice about how to choose the right glasses, speak to one of our certified online opticians today or visit our Optical Center.

All The Benefits of Essilor Crizal Forte UV Lenses

All The Benefits Of Essilor Crizal Forte UV Lenses

Lens technologies | What are anti-reflective lenses? | What are anti-reflective lenses? | What is crizal forte uv? | Do essilor crizal lenses protect my eyes from uv light? | Crizal forte uv features | Arise hd prescription lenses | Protective coatings from arise collective

Essilor Crizal Forte UV handle glare, water droplets, dust, scratches and smudges with ease, so you can enjoy clear vision without cleaning your glasses every 5 minutes.

Are you an eyeglasses wearer? Are you tired of being blinded in the rain, constantly cleaning off smudges and losing sight due to scratched lenses?

If so, it may be time to enhance your visual experience with some high-quality lenses. Think Arise Collective HD, all the benefits of Essilor Crizal Forte UV Lenses, or our premium lens selection.

Lens technologies

There has been a world of technological breakthroughs in the lenses market, and as a result there is a range of different options when it comes to choosing your lenses.

  • Single vision lenses, for vision improvement over either short or long distances, but not both.
  • Multifocal lenses, for vision improvement over multiple distances.
  • Multicoated lenses, for protection against dust, water and scratches.
  • Transition lenses, for adapting to high- and low-light situations.

High-index lenses, for the thinnest, best-looking way of improving your eyesight.

DID YOU KNOW?

Essilor Crizal Forte UV lenses offer the highest UV protection possible for clear lenses.

What are anti-reflective lenses?

Anti-reflective/anti-glare/AR coating improves vision, eye strain and makes your eyeglasses look better. These benefits are due to the ability of AR coating to eliminate nearly all reflections from both sides of your lenses.

With reflections gone, more light passes through your lenses to optimize visual acuity. This increased amount of light can be really beneficial at night, when your eyes need all the help they can get.

What lens coatings do my glasses need?

At SmartBuyGlasses, we can fit your glasses with a number of different coatings to suit your eyewear needs. These include:

  • UV400, with optimized protection for UVA and UVB.
  • Anti-reflective, to reduce glare and increase the amount of light entering your lenses.
  • Scratch-resistant, with added protection against wear and tear.
  • Impact-X, for optimal eye protection in tough conditions.
  • Aspheric, which are thinner, flatter and lighter than conventional lenses.
  • Superhydrophobic, with water-repellant technology.

What is crizal forte uv?

Crizal Forte UV is an exclusive anti-reflecting technology from Essilor. It’s specifically designed to protect your eyes from UV light.

Essilor Crizal lens technology is applied to both sides of your glasses lenses so as to block both the direct UV light that passes through the front of your glasses, AND the UV rays reflected off the rear surface of your lenses.

SmartBuyGlasses is not affiliated and does not currently sell Essilor lenses online but does recognise their excellent quality.

Do essilor crizal lenses protect my eyes from uv light?

Essilor broad spectrum technology lenses provide your eyes with superior protection against harmful UV radiation and have a 25 E-SPF (eye-sun protection factor) rating.

In fact, they claim that their lenses are the best in terms of UV light protection for long-term eye health.

Crizal forte uv features

In addition, Essilor Crizal Forte UV lenses offer some of the most advanced anti-reflective lens technology available today.

Additionally, these high-tech lenses protect you against the big five obstacles to clear vision:

  1. Reflections & glares.
  2. Water droplets.
  3. Dust.
  4. Scratches.
  5. Smudges.

By upgrading your ordinary lenses, you can enjoy crystal clear vision with some of the best lens technology the eyewear world has to offer.

Arise hd prescription lenses

While we don’t sell Crizal Forte lenses at SmartBuyGlasses, we do sell anti-reflective lenses with the Arise HD clarity range.

Arise HD Clarity prescription lenses are made for the everyday wearer, but also offer advanced protection making them suitable for any adventure. These lenses are suitable for all vision impairments and can be customized for your every need.

Whether you need reading glasses, driving glasses or prescription glasses for astigmatism, myopia or presbyopia – Arise HD Clarity lenses are fitted to your prescription and your needs.

Protective coatings from arise collective

The Arise Clarity Lens Collection comes packed with protective elements to provide you with an unbeatable pair of prescription glasses. From scratch resistant and anti-reflective coatings to UV 400 and superhydrophobic protection – these lenses are purpose-built to protect your eyes, no matter the conditions.

These lenses are also aspheric, making them thinner and lighter than many other prescription lenses. These high performing, durable lenses feature an innovative lens technology that provides optimal clarity and comfort from the urban jungle to the actual jungle.

Stay protected at SmartBuyGlasses. We stock all thousands of glasses with a wide range of lens materials. If you have any questions, visit our Ask the Optician page to find out more!

Transitions® Lenses

Transitions® Lenses

What are Transitions® lenses? | How they differ | How they work | Pros and cons | Non-prescription | Blue light | Care guide

Transitions® lenses contain photochromic molecules, which cause the lenses to automatically darken and clear depending on the surrounding light conditions.

If you’ve ever found yourself fumbling between your prescription eyeglasses and prescription sunglasses when moving from indoors to outdoors, Transitions® lenses are a great solution to make everyday life simpler. 

Transitions® lenses are a type of photochromic lens that is transparent when indoors but automatically darkens outdoors when exposed to UV rays. With their unique design, they may eliminate the need for two separate pairs of glasses.

What are Transitions® lenses?

Considered light intelligent lenses, Transitions® lenses are eyeglasses that are designed to adapt to changing environments. Their lenses automatically adjust their tint according to the surrounding light conditions. These light-adaptive lenses are designed to darken when exposed to UV light and become clear again indoors or in low-light conditions.

Considered light intelligent lenses, Transitions® lenses are eyeglasses that are designed to adapt to changing environments. Their lenses automatically adjust their tint according to the surrounding light conditions.

These light-adaptive lenses are designed to darken when exposed to UV light and become clear again indoors or in low-light conditions.

How are Transitions® lenses different from ordinary lenses?

Transitions® lenses differ from ordinary lenses primarily in their ability to adapt to changing light conditions. Transition lenses are designed to be light-sensitive and react to UV exposure, while standard lenses are not. 

Transitions® lenses offer built-in UV protection. When they darken, they block a significant amount of harmful UVA and UVB rays, reducing the risk of eye damage. Unless specifically treated with a UV coating, ordinary lenses may not provide the same level of UV protection.

It’s important to note that while Transitions® lenses provide convenience and UV protection, they may not be suitable for every individual or specific situation. Personal preference, lifestyle, and specific optical needs should be considered when choosing between Transitions® lenses and ordinary lenses.

Transitions® lenses differ from ordinary lenses primarily in their ability to adapt to changing light conditions. Transition lenses are designed to be light-sensitive and react to UV exposure, while standard lenses are not. 

Transitions® lenses offer built-in UV protection. When they darken, they block a significant amount of harmful UVA and UVB rays, reducing the risk of eye damage. Unless specifically treated with a UV coating, ordinary lenses may not provide the same level of UV protection.

It’s important to note that while Transitions® lenses provide convenience and UV protection, they may not be suitable for every individual or specific situation. Personal preference, lifestyle, and specific optical needs should be considered when choosing between Transitions® lenses and ordinary lenses.

What is the difference between Transitions® and photochromic lenses?

Transitions® lenses and photochromic lenses work the same way and are essentially the same thing. Transitions® is a brand name and type of photochromic lens manufactured by Transitions Optical Limited. 

Therefore, the primary difference between the two lies in their names and the companies that produce them. Photochromic lenses, including Transitions® lenses, are eyeglass lenses that automatically adjust their tint in response to changing light conditions.

While Transitions® lenses are a well-known and widely used brand of photochromic lenses, other lens manufacturers also produce photochromic lenses under different names. These lenses may have slight variations in activation and fade speeds, darkness levels, or available lens options. 

Still, the core technology and purpose remain the same—to provide an adaptive tint that adjusts to different lighting conditions.

How do Transitions® lenses work?

Lens technology is constantly evolving and continuously improving. Transitions® lenses work through a process called photochromism. The lenses contain unique photochromic molecules that undergo a chemical reaction when exposed to UV light, causing them to change their molecular structure and darken. 

In their unexposed state, Transitions® lenses are transparent, allowing for clear vision indoors or in low-light conditions. When the lenses are exposed to bright light from the sun or other sources, the molecules in them react and change form. As a result of the chemical reaction, the molecules rearrange themselves, causing the lenses to darken. 

The speed at which Transitions® lenses darken depends on the presence of UV light, its amount, and the temperature. In the bright sun, they will change more quickly; in less light, they’ll change more slowly. They generally begin darkening within seconds of UV exposure and continue to darken for a few minutes. 

When Transitions® lenses are no longer exposed to UV light, such as when you move indoors, or the sun goes down, the molecules gradually return to their original configuration. This causes the lenses to lighten and eventually become clear again, typically taking about 2-3 minutes.

Lens technology is constantly evolving and continuously improving. Transitions® lenses work through a process called photochromism.

The lenses contain unique photochromic molecules that undergo a chemical reaction when exposed to UV light, causing them to change their molecular structure and darken. 

In their unexposed state, Transitions® lenses are transparent, allowing for clear vision indoors or in low-light conditions. When the lenses are exposed to bright light from the sun or other sources, the molecules in them react and change form.

As a result of the chemical reaction, the molecules rearrange themselves, causing the lenses to darken. The speed at which Transitions® lenses darken depends on the presence of UV light, its amount, and the temperature.

In the bright sun, they will change more quickly; in less light, they’ll change more slowly. They generally begin darkening within seconds of UV exposure and continue to darken for a few minutes. 

When Transitions® lenses are no longer exposed to UV light, such as when you move indoors, or the sun goes down, the molecules gradually return to their original configuration. This causes the lenses to lighten and eventually become clear again, typically taking about 2-3 minutes.

Pros and cons of Transitions® lenses

It’s essential to consider individual preferences, lifestyle, and specific optical needs when assessing the advantages and disadvantages of Transitions® lenses. While they offer numerous benefits, some individuals may still prefer dedicated prescription glasses and sunglasses for specific purposes or styles.

One of the most significant advantages is their convenience and cost-effectiveness. They eliminate the need to switch between two pairs of glasses when transitioning between indoor and outdoor environments. While the upfront cost of Transitions® lenses may be higher than regular lenses, they can potentially lead to long-term savings. 

Transitions® lenses also offer built-in UV protection, which is essential in safeguarding your eyes from sun damage caused by UVA and UVB rays. By adjusting their tint based on the surrounding light, they also help reduce eye fatigue and strain, reduce glare, and provide comfortable vision by optimizing the amount of light entering the eyes.

It’s essential to consider individual preferences, lifestyle, and specific optical needs when assessing the advantages and disadvantages of Transitions® lenses.

One of the most significant advantages is their convenience and cost-effectiveness. They eliminate the need to switch between two pairs of glasses when transitioning between indoor and outdoor environments.

While the upfront cost of Transitions® lenses may be higher than regular lenses, they can potentially lead to long-term savings. 

Transitions® lenses also offer built-in UV protection, which is essential in safeguarding your eyes from sun damage caused by UVA and UVB rays.

By adjusting their tint based on the surrounding light, they also help reduce eye fatigue and strain, reduce glare, and provide comfortable vision by optimizing the amount of light entering the eyes.

There are also some potential disadvantages to consider. The speed at which Transitions® lenses darken and clear indoors may vary depending on temperature, UV intensity, and lens brand. 

In very hot climates, the lenses may not darken as much as desired, potentially providing less sun protection. Likewise, the lenses may not lighten as quickly in extremely cold temperatures, causing them to remain darker indoors.

Another thing to consider is the limited lens activation behind the windshield. As most car windshields are designed to block a significant amount of UV radiation, which is necessary for the lenses to activate and darken. 

Some models, including the Transitions XTRActive® lenses, have more photochromic molecules allowing them to transition even while in the car. These lenses always have a very light base tint and will not go as dark in the car as outdoors.

Can you get non-prescription Transitions® lenses?

Transitions® lenses are available in prescription and non-prescription options, allowing individuals with or without vision correction to enjoy the benefits of light-adaptive eyewear.

Non-prescription Transitions® lenses are commonly used by individuals who do not require vision correction but still want the convenience of photochromic glasses. They provide the same light-adaptive properties as prescription Transitions® lenses, automatically adjusting their tint in response to changing light conditions.

Can Transitions® lenses offer blue light protection?

Transitions® lenses are designed to protect your eyes from UV rays outdoors and harmful blue light indoors. Transitions® Signature® GEN 8™ lenses are specifically designed to filter up to four times more blue light indoors than clear lenses. 

If you spend a lot of time in front of digital devices, you may want to consider Transitions® XTRActive®, which filters up to seven times more blue light indoors than clear lenses.

DID YOU KNOW

Transitions® lenses offer vision correction and protect against blue light and UV rays, making it easy to transition from screens to sunlight.

How to care for Transitions® lenses

To ensure the longevity and optimal performance of your Transitions® lenses, taking proper care of them is essential. Clean them regularly to remove dirt, smudges, and oils. Use a mild, non-abrasive lens cleaner or a gentle soap solution with lukewarm water. Avoid using harsh chemicals or abrasive materials that could damage the lenses.

When cleaning your glasses, use a soft, lint-free microfiber cloth specifically designed for cleaning eyeglass lenses. Store your Transitions® lenses in a protective case to prevent scratches or accidental damage when not in use. 

Excessive heat or prolonged exposure to direct sunlight can potentially affect the performance and longevity of the lenses. Avoid leaving your glasses in hot temperatures, such as a closed car during sunny days. When not wearing your glasses, store them in a cool, dry place away from direct sunlight.

Most photochromic lenses perform well for 3+ years, but eventually, they will become less reactive to light conditions and take longer to shift between clear and tinted. It is important to schedule eye exams with your eye doctor to maintain eye health. They can assess the condition of your glasses, check for any signs of wear or damage, and ensure your prescription is up to date.

To ensure the longevity and optimal performance of your Transitions® lenses, taking proper care of them is essential. Clean them regularly to remove dirt, smudges, and oils. Use a mild, non-abrasive lens cleaner or a gentle soap solution with lukewarm water.

Avoid using harsh chemicals or abrasive materials that could damage the lenses. When cleaning your glasses, use a soft, lint-free microfiber cloth specifically designed for cleaning eyeglass lenses.

Store your Transitions® lenses in a protective case to prevent scratches or accidental damage when not in use. Store them in a cool, dry place away from direct sunlight.

Excessive heat or prolonged exposure to direct sunlight can potentially affect the performance and longevity of the lenses. Avoid leaving your glasses in hot temperatures, such as a closed car during sunny days. 

Most photochromic lenses perform well for 3+ years, but eventually, they will become less reactive to light conditions and take longer to shift between clear and tinted.

It is important to schedule eye exams with your eye doctor to maintain eye health. They can assess the condition of your glasses, check for any signs of wear or damage, and ensure your prescription is up to date.

Are Transitions® lenses right for me?

Determining whether Transitions® lenses are suitable for you depends on various factors and personal preferences. They can be highly beneficial if you are particularly sensitive to bright light situations or spend a significant amount of time moving between indoors and outdoors. 

It’s recommended to consult with an eye care professional who can assess your visual needs, discuss your preferences, and provide personalized recommendations. If you still have questions, head to our Optical Center to speak with one of our in-house Opticians, who can help determine if Transitions® lenses are the right choice.

Determining whether Transitions® lenses are suitable for you depends on various factors and personal preferences. They can be highly beneficial if you are particularly sensitive to bright light situations or spend a significant amount of time moving between indoors and outdoors. 

It’s recommended to consult with an eye care professional who can assess your visual needs, discuss your preferences, and provide personalized recommendations.

If you still have questions, head to our Optical Center to speak with one of our in-house Opticians, who can help determine if Transitions® lenses are the right choice.

High Index Lenses

High Index Lenses

What are high-index lenses? | What are high-index lenses made of? | High-index lenses vs. regular | High-index lenses vs. polycarbonate | 1.67 vs. 1.74 high-index lenses | Are high-index lenses worth it? | Disadvantages of high-index lenses

Thick lenses are an aesthetic concern for many people, but high index lenses allow strong prescription lenses to be thinned. Learn all about them in this article.

Lens index indicates how thick or thin a lens is. Also known as the index of refraction or refractive index, it is measured by numbers and describes how efficiently a material bends light. High-index lenses allow people with strong prescriptions to wear eyeglasses with thinner lenses.

Read on to learn what high-index lenses exactly are and how they compare to other types of lenses. 

What are high-index lenses?

High-index lenses are thin, light and powerful lenses. Prescription glasses equipped with high-index lenses are noticeably slimmer, more lightweight and more stylish. That’s why high-index lenses are recommended for people with strong eyeglasses prescriptions.

Typically, those with higher vision correction needs will be forced to wear thicker and bulky conventional glass or plastic lenses that are thicker towards the edges. But with the emergence of high-index materials, the optical industry has been transformed.

Now, strong refractive errors as myopiahyperopiapresbyopia and astigmatism can be corrected with thinner lenses with no compromise on efficacy. 

Thanks to high-index lenses, strong prescription glasses can now be sported in stylish, semi-rimless and even rimless styles. Most high-index lenses are also aspheric, making them slimmer and eliminating the “bug-eye” look to a great extent.

What are high-index lenses made of?

Most high-index lenses are made of a particular type of light plastic that bends light more efficiently than other lens materials. There are also high-index lenses made of glass, but they are recommended or prescribed less often.

Lens thickness chart

DID YOU KNOW?

The first high index lenses were produced in 1983, made from polycarbonate.

High-index lenses vs. regular

Both regular lenses and high-index ones bend light to correct refractive errors. The difference is that regular lenses have to be thicker to correct strong prescriptions, while high-index lenses are made of a material that makes them lighter and thinner.

In general, the stronger the prescription, the higher the index should be for the glasses to offer comfortable vision and fit. For example, a regular lens with a 1.50 index and a 1.67 high index lens can have the same prescription, but the high index lens would be around 30% thinner.

High-index lenses vs. polycarbonate

Polycarbonate lenses have a 1.59 index, making them thinner than standard lenses but not as much as high-index lenses.

They are also impact-resistant, offering increased durability. In general, polycarbonate lenses are only recommended for children’s glasses, sports eyewear and safety goggles because they don’t provide the same visual clarity as other plastic lenses.

1.67 vs. 1.74 high-index lenses

Both 1.67 and 1.74 high-index lenses can accommodate strong prescriptions. The difference is in the thickness. 1.74 high-index lenses are up to 10% thinner than 1.67 high-index lenses. 

As a reference, 1.67 high-index lenses are recommended for strong prescription with an SPH correction between +/-7.00 and +/-9.00, and a CYL correction between +/-3.25 and +/-4.00.

1.74 high index lenses are known “as thin as possible” lenses and are recommended for even stronger prescriptions with SPH corrections around +/-9.25 and above, and CYL corrections around +/-4.25 and +/-6.00.

They are 35% thinner than the standard lenses. Although they appear thin, they are at the same time strong and will include the features to correct vision problems. 

Are high-index lenses worth it?

High-index lenses are the solution for accommodating high prescriptions in thinner lenses. That is not all, though; here are all the advantages of choosing high-index lenses:

  • Thinner and lighter than other lenses: the specific plastic blend makes it possible to create thinner and lighter lenses that provide better light refraction than regular ones.
  • Versatility: high index lenses can be customized according to your needs and preferences. They can be single vision, progressives, transitions, and can be treated with many coatings such as blue light, polarization, anti-reflective, and more.
  • Comfort: because they are lighter and thinner than other types, high-index lenses offer a higher level of comfort. With high-index lenses, your glasses will not be heavy on your ears and nose, making your life easier. 
  • Great fit for most frames:high index lenses fit thousand of different frames. Always remember that the bigger the frame, the thicker the lens, so opticians recommend smaller frames if you have a strong prescription.

Disadvantages of high-index lenses

  • More fragile than other lenses: high index lenses are not as impact resistant as other types of lenses. This means that they are not indicated for children or sports.  
  • More expensive than other lenses: These lenses offer many benefits but are also a bit more expensive than regular lenses. For many wearers, though, their benefits outweigh the price difference compared to lower index lenses. 

High-index lenses might be perfect if you want more comfort and a better appearance. Before deciding on your lens index, talk to your eye doctor or take advantage of our free online optician support service to see which lens is best for your eye prescription.

How Do You Know What Strength Reading Glasses to Get?

How Do You Know What Strength Reading Glasses To Get?

Do I need reading glasses? | Eye test for readers glasses: how to find out if you need readers | At home reading glasses test | What if my glasses don’t work | What are reading glasses and the many types you can choose from | Will reading glasses help my astigmatism? | Where to buy reading glasses: 5 easy steps to buy the perfect pair

As reading glassses aren't tailored to your prescription, it's not always evident which ones to go for.

As the name suggests, reading glasses are glasses that help read, see objects in close range or complete daunting tasks like threading a needle. When buying a pair of readers, there are several types to choose from, which can be good but also confusing. 

What lenses work best? How do you know what strength to get? Will the reading glasses help your astigmatism? We are here to answer all these questions and more.

Do I need reading glasses?

Presbyopia is the gradual loss of your eye’s ability to focus on nearby objects. The symptoms of presbyopia are typically an age-related condition that occurs and deteriorates over a period of time. The best way to find out what strength reading glasses to get is by consulting an eye doctor and getting medical advice.

Because it is an age-related condition, we advise seeing an eye doctor regularly as the age progresses, especially if you are already experiencing some of the symptoms mentioned above.

Even though presbyopia tends to be an age-related condition, people younger than 40 also tend to get it because of the modern-day nature of working on near-distance objects, especially on digital devices.

A comfortable pair of prescription reading glasses can help with vision correction; they magnify vision, making smaller print larger and easier to read.

Eye test for readers glasses: how to find out if you need readers

As we approach the age of 40, the lenses in our eyes gradually lose their flexibility and get stiff, meaning vision tends to get unclear, resulting in needing to pull up objects very close or farther away.

Some signs that you need reading glasses may be that you feel fatigued or even getting headaches from trying to read small text, squinting when looking at something in close range, or having to hold a book at arm’s length to see better.

These are symptoms of presbyopia, typically an age-related condition that occurs and deteriorates over a period of time. Since this leads to losing the ability to flex and focus at near distance, presbyopic patients hold objects farther away from them, as much as possible.

These days people who are younger than 40 also tend to get presbyopic, owing to the modern-day nature of working on near distance objects, especially on digital devices. 

Hence, investing in a comfortable pair of prescription reading glasses can aid in vision correction as they magnify vision, thereby making smaller print bigger and easier to read. This is the best solution as fighting through the discomfort will not help your eyes. 

Some individuals feel that wearing reading glasses worsens their condition because when they take off their glasses, the text appears blurrier and smaller. Did you know that you see with your brain?

This means that your brain is used to seeing clear, legibly sized text while you’re wearing your glasses, when they’re taken off, the contrast is evident.

At home reading glasses test

When looking for reading glasses and not knowing what power to select, it can be very tempting to search for at-home tests to give you that information. Unfortunately, determining the strength of the glasses on your own can lead to selecting the wrong power and damaging your eyes.

By deciding what power to get on your own, you could end up using more power than you truly need; this could lead to your eyes getting used to it and making your vision worse.

If you need a pair of reading glasses, the best way to find out which power works for you is by consulting an eye specialist. This will prevent you from getting the wrong glasses and damaging your vision.

DID YOU KNOW?

Many people experience the onset of presbyopia after the age of 40, and begin to use reading glasses.

What if my glasses don’t work

If you’re already wearing reading glasses and find yourself experiencing headaches or still having difficulties reading, you might start to wonder if your reading glasses are effective or not. Chances are you got your prescription a very long time ago and now need more power in your lenses, which means you should probably get your eyes checked.

Another reason why your reading glasses might not be working for you is that you chose the power without consulting a specialist. If you still struggle reading, you probably chose the wrong power and need to consult a specialist. Once you have that sorted, you will be able to choose between different types of lenses.

What are reading glasses and the many types you can choose from

The most common type of lenses for reading glasses are single-vision lenses; in this case, both lenses have the same power. Multifocal/progressive lenses, on the other hand, have multiple prescriptions in one lens, which makes it easier to switch between seeing close-up, in-between, and far away.

Multifocal lenses are the best choice for those looking to correct more than one problem, while single-vision lenses can be a good option if you need the same power for both eyes and only have one prescription.  Another option to consider is adding a blue light block to your lenses.

This will help with eyestrain, fatigue, and headaches whenever being in front of a screen for many hours. Check out our guide for more information on buying glasses online and the types of lenses we offer.

Will reading glasses help my astigmatism?

Although the symptoms of astigmatism and presbyopia may seem similar, reading glasses cannot help all individuals with astigmatism. It is important to remember that generic reading glasses only magnify whatever you look up close.

Because people with astigmatism may also be nearsighted or farsighted, reading glasses are not advised if you suffer from astigmatism. To determine whether you have astigmatism, we advise seeing an eye professional.

Where to buy reading glasses: 5 easy steps to buy the perfect pair

With so many options, both over-the-counter and online, it can be confusing to choose the best pair. So here are five easy steps to select the best readers from the comfort of your home and immediately start seeing better!

Step 1: Head to our website

Step 2: Head to our glasses section

Step 3: Filter to reading glasses

Step 4: Choose your favorite frames and select the power (It is possible to choose from +1.00, +1.50, +2.00, +2.50, +3.00, and +3.50)

Step 5: Securely check out online!

With SmartBuy Readers, you can invest in several pairs to always have one nearby. Keep a pair in the office, one in your handbag, one in your car, and one at home so you always have easy access to clearer vision. If you have any more questions about reading glasses, ask our opticians!

Thick Lens Glasses

Thick Lens Glasses

Why are my glasses lenses so thick? | Do prisms make glasses thicker? | What shape glasses are best for thick lenses?

Discover the reason behind thick lens glasses and why prescription lenses can vary greatly.

Prescription lenses can vary drastically for each individual, depending on their unique needs. The density of lenses may range from paper-thin to the ‘coke bottle’ effect. But why is this? 

If you have thick glasses, your prescription is likely stronger than most. But what is the purpose of thick lens glasses? Prescription lenses bend the light through curved lenses as it enters your eye. Short-sighted wearers will have lenses that are thicker on the edge and thinner in the middle, while those who are long-sighted will have the opposite.

Why are my glasses lenses so thick?

To understand why you have thick glasses lenses, you need to be aware of your refractive power. The refractive power is the amount that light needs to be bent when entering your eye for you to see clearly. The more light needs to be bent, the higher the refractive power (prescription) will be; therefore the thicker your lenses will be.

Another point to think about is your glasses’ frame size and pupillary distance. Lens thickness will increase as the frame size increases due to the edge of the lens being utilized to fit the frame.

Therefore, the larger the frame, the thicker the lens. A minus RX will be thicker at the edges, while a plus RX will be thicker in the middle.  Your pupillary distance may also change where the thickness occurs if the frame is too large for you

How thick can glasses get?

How thick the glasses lens will be is determined by a few factors. The material of your lenses contributes to the thickness, as well as your prescription and personal choice. Thanks to new technology, high-index lenses were introduced to help reduce thickness and weight of the lenses.

High-index lenses are made from a plastic material that allows better light refraction in a thin lens. Many people opt for high-index lenses because they have a more sleek look. If you’re asking yourself, “Do I need high index lenses?” you can discover our thin lenses guide to get a better understanding of what they are and whether they are right for you or not. 

DID YOU KNOW?
The article explores the reason behind thick lenses, explaining why prisms make lenses thicker and what are the best frame shapes based on your prescription. 

Do prisms make glasses thicker?

Some eyewear users may experience double vision (diplopia) which requires prism glasses to correct their eyesight. Prism glasses refract the light before entering your lenses rather than when it passes through.

Prism will make the lenses thicker, the higher the prism, the thicker it will be. However, experimenting with various frame styles can help hide the thickness if you feel it is too obvious or bothers you.

Why is one lens thicker than the other?

If you’re noticing that one of your lenses is thicker than the other one, the reason behind that is very simple: different strengths in your prescription. In fact, prescriptions are usually not symmetrical: you may be seeing better in one eye rather than the other. Sometimes the difference can be so slight that it is unnoticeable; other times, if the difference is more drastic, it becomes more noticeable. 

What shape glasses are best for thick lenses?

Getting a pair of new glasses can be confusing, especially for people with strong prescriptions: certain frame types are not advised as they might affect the overall performance of the glasses. To make the process of shopping for new glasses easier, we have put together a brief guide for both myopic (minus) and nearsighted (plus) prescriptions. 

Minus RX Recommendations

Plus RX Recommendations

Now that you have a better understanding of thick-lens glasses and know what frame is best for your prescription, shopping for glasses online won’t be so intimidating or confusing! 

If you want to learn more about trick lenses or lenses in general, visit our Optical Center. You will find many informative articles on the subject, all thoroughly reviewed by our certified opticians. 

What Are Polarized Sunglasses?

What Are Polarized Sunglasses?

Uses | How they work | How to spot polarized lenses | When can I use them? | Advantages | Disadvantages | UV vs Polarization | Are they right for you?

Learn what polarized sunglasses are good for and what the difference is between polarized and non-polarized sunglasses.

Polarized sunglasses are high-functioning eyewear with many benefits for outdoor enthusiasts. If you’ve found yourself asking these questions and wondering whether or not polarized sunglasses are good for you, read on to find out more.

What are polarized sunglasses for?

Polarized sunglasses block out the horizontal blinding glare that causes you to squint. Light from the sun hits horizontal surfaces and is reflected back from them which causes glare. Polarized sunglasses reduce this glare using polarised  filter to create vertical openings for light to pass through.

Not only do they make colours more distinguishable, but they also add clarity to your vision by reducing bright sunlight. Glare from reflected light can be annoying and sometimes dangerous as it alters colours perception and causes visual discomfort, so wearing polarized lenses can help you to see more clearly.

How do polarized lenses work?

Polarized lenses have opposite layers aligned at the opposite polars. These molecules absorb horizontal light before it reaches your eyes but allow verticallight to pass through.

Polarized sunglass lenses also contain other coatings that protect your eyes from the harmful effects of direct sunlight. 

The benefits of blocking horizontally reflected light, such as reducing eye strain, make polarized lenses worth the investment. You’ll notice this if you’ve ever looked at the water’s surface on a sunny day before and after putting on polarized lenses. 

Usually, you look at the surface of water on a sunny day and see the light reflecting off the top of the water, but once you put on polarised sunglasses you can no longer see this shine on the surface.

How to tell if sunglasses are polarized

With the qualities of polarized lenses in mind, you can determine whether your sunglasses are polarized by looking through the lenses in front of reflective surfaces, such as water or pavement.

Another way to test your sunglasses is to put them on and look at your phone or tablet when switched on. All you have to do to see your screen is rotate your device 90 degrees. If your screen is black, your sunglasses are polarized with a filter that blocks horizontal polarized light. Please note this does not work on all screens, only older models, and the best way to tell is by putting them to the glare test as outlined above.

When can I use polarized lenses?

There’s a high risk of experiencing sudden blinding moments as a result of glare, which is very dangerous for activities like driving. Polarized sunglasses make life easier if you’re an outdoor sports lover, playing golf, or fishing

The technology of polarized lenses reduces the light that affects your eyesight on a sunny day. Whether you enjoy a day on the lake or s, there are a variety of sunglasses with polarized lenses that will be perfect for you.

What are the advantages of polarized sunglasses?

Polarized sunglasses can benefit anyone participating in activities under direct sunlight or near the water. Polarized sunglasses reduce glare, improving visual clarity and enhancing the world around us with vibrant colours. 

Polarized lenses can also enhance the colour contrast we see when exposed to the sun. This attribute benefits athletes, fishing enthusiasts, and anyone who loves the outdoors and wants greater depth perception to enhance their performance.

Polarized sunglasses are perfect for time spent by the water, as they help eliminate the light that reflects from the surface.

Other added benefits include:

Many polarized sunglasses offer 100% UV protection, but always check the product description to ensure this.You can also add your prescription to polarized sunglasses to see clearly and protect your eyes simultaneously.

Are there any disadvantages to wearing polarized glasses?

While it is a matter of preference, there are some situations where non-polarized lenses might be more beneficial than polarized sunglasses. For example, polarized sunglasses are not recommended in the aviation environment. As it is more difficult to see electronic screens, so pilots are advised to wear non-polarized sunglasses while flying.

DID YOU KNOW

Polarized glasses are perfect for those who love outdoor activities. They make a great long-term investment for anyone looking to up their performance in a range of sports.

What is the difference between UV blocking and polarization?

Regarding protecting your eyes from harmful UV rays, there are two options: UV blocking and polarization. While both types of lenses offer some protection, they work in different ways. UV-blocking lenses prevent UV rays from penetrating the lens material, while polarized lenses reduce glare by blocking horizontal light waves.

It’s important to note that not all polarized lenses offer UV protection, so make sure you’re wearing polarized sunglasses that also block UV rays. Regardless of which type of lens you choose, wearing sunglasses is an important part of protecting your eyes from the sun’s harmful rays.

Should you wear polarized sunglasses?

Regardless of whether you spend time outdoors or not, a polarized lens offers many advantages for everyday life. Having a pair of go-to polarized sunglasses is a no-brainer if you are serious about protecting your eyes from UV light. 

These lenses are amazing for providing optimum eye comfort and most polarized sunglasses lovers agree that once you go polarized you will never go back!

However, if you need to view strictly digital screens for your job, for example, if you are a pilot, you should not wear polarized sunglasses. If you are still determining whether polarized sunglasses are right for your lifestyle, contact our online opticians for advice.

If you’re interested in learning about other lenses, read about reflective lenses, Transitions® lenses, and much more. Once you decide which lenses are the best fit for you, have a look at the variety of sunglasses and prescription styles available at SmartBuyGlasses.

Trivex vs Polycarbonate Lenses

Trivex vs Polycarbonate Lenses

Should I get Trivex or polycarbonate? | What are polycarbonate lenses? | Do polycarbonate lenses block UV? | How to clean polycarbonate lenses | What are trivex lenses? | Are Trivex lenses worth it? How thick are trivex lenses? | Are Trivex lenses better than polycarbonate?

Polycarbonate and Trivex lenses have a ot of similar properties. In this article, we weigh up the differences between the two lens materials.

Even more than the frame or design, the lenses you choose have a big influence on how happy you are with your glasses.

When buying glasses, one of the most common mistakes people make is not giving enough thought to the lens materials, designs, and lens coatings. Your lens choice impacts your comfort, vision, and safety, as well as appearance.

Should I get trivex or polycarbonate?

Buying prescription glasses is a difficult task. With so many lens material options and coatings, it’s easy to become overwhelmed about which ones are best for you. This article will give you insight into different types of lenses and help you to choose the best lenses for your needs.

Trivex vs Polycarbonate: Let’s look at the difference between the two lens materials

What are polycarbonate lenses?

DID YOU KNOW?

You can rest assured that Trivex lenses are tough. Trivex was originally designed for military use, specifically in the windshields of helicopters and fighter jets!

Polycarbonate first appeared in the 1950s, but it wasn’t until the 1980s that companies first started to use it as an alternative to glass lenses.

Polycarbonate pellets are heated to their melting point and inserted into lens molds, while normal plastic lenses are manufactured using cast molding. This alternative production method strengthens and improves the impact resistance of polycarbonate.

Therefore, polycarbonate lenses are made of a more impact-resistant plastic than regular plastic lenses. This material lenses are also significantly thinner and lighter than glass lenses. These qualities make it the best material for kid’s glassessports glasses, and safety glasses.

There are both advantages and fallbacks of polycarbonate lenses that are important to consider. Polycarbonate is more scratch resistant than plastic, but less than trivex lenses. However, this can be mitigated if you apply a scratch-resistant coating to the lenses.

The abbe value of a lens material correlates to the quality of vision through the lens. Due to the fact that polycarbonate lenses have a low abbe value, certain people with higher prescriptions and high astigmatism frequently complain that the lenses have poor optical clarity, distortion, or disrupt their peripheral vision.

Do polycarbonate lenses block UV?

Polycarbonate lenses block nearly the entire UV spectrum, including UVA and UVB. UV radiation is absorbed by the material, which prevents it from passing through. It is so effective, that even a small layer of the material can effectively absorb UV rays. This shields the skin and eyes significantly better than any sun lotion could.

In addition, polycarbonate lenses transmit visible light, the part of the spectrum that allows us to perceive colour. Despite the fact that you may have to consider scratch-resistant coatings for polycarbonate lenses, an extra lens treatment for UV Protection is not required.

How to clean polycarbonate lenses

If you wear glasses, you know how aggravating it is to have dirt or grit on your lenses. In addition to being annoying, it can also cause eye strain and headaches.

Make sure to keep your lenses clean for optimal optical clarity, whatever lens option you opt for. When cleaning your polycarbonate lenses, you should always take care. Here are some great tips to take the best care of your lenses. 

Before rubbing your lenses, gently rinse them with warm water to remove any dust or debris that could scratch them. If you live somewhere with hard water, use distilled water instead of tap water.

A microfiber cloth is the safest and most effective way to clean your glasses without creating stains or damage. Don’t be tempted to use your sleeve or the edge of your shirt!

It’s preferable to use a glasses cleaning solution or spray safe for polycarbonate and lens coatings. You can alternatively use lotion-free dish soap.

Shake off any excess water droplets from your glasses. Dry them using an air canister to avoid streaks and watermarks.

Now that you know more about polycarbonate lenses, let’s take a look at trivex lenses.

What are trivex lenses?

Trivex is a type of durable, lightweight plastic that has hit the market in recent years. While polycarbonate has been the industry standard for safety glasses, sports goggles, and children’s glasses for many years, many optometrists now recommend trivex lenses as an alternative.

While trivex is comparable to polycarbonate, it has a few key differences. Trivex was initially designed for military use in helicopter and fighter aircraft windows. The material’s chemistry was tailored for use in optical lenses in 2002, making trivex lenses one of the most durable and desirable lenses on the market.

Are trivex lenses worth it?

To put it simply, trivex lenses are more comfortable than other plastic glasses lens materials, which is one of the most significant advantages. Trivex lenses are thinner than ordinary plastic lenses, with a 1.53 index.

They are also made from a lighter material than plastic lenses, so you won’t notice the weight of your lenses as you go about your day. Additionally, lightweight lenses are more comfortable and prevent the glasses from sliding down your nose or falling off your face.

Similar to a polycarbonate lens, trivex lenses provide full UV protection. UV protection is built into the material of trivex lenses, which means the protection will not degrade over time. The UV protection only degrades if it is applied to the lens through a coating, which is not the case with trivex lenses.

A lot of people wonder, “Does Trivex scratch easily?”. Although trivex is clearer and lighter than polycarbonate, it’s just as tough. Trivex lenses have strong impact resistance and robustness, which makes them durable and resistant to cracks and breaks. These characteristics are ideal for designs such as rimless glasses.

Trivex lenses have a higher Abbe value of 45, whereas polycarbonate lenses have an Abbe value of 30. This means that trivex will give you exceptionally clear vision thanks to their higher abbe value.

When you choose trivex lenses, you don’t have to compromise in terms of core features, but they may be more costly. Although they are more expensive than polycarbonate lenses, they are considered the ideal lens by many eye care specialists.

How thick are trivex lenses?

Unlike lenses made from standard plastic, which tend to be around 2mm thick, trivex lenses are around 1.2mm. Since polycarbonate has a greater refraction index than trivex (1.58 vs. 1.53), polycarbonate lenses are around 10% thinner. However, they are both excellent choices for thin lenses.

Are trivex lenses better than polycarbonate?

Finding the best lens material for you depends on your needs and lifestyle. You can use this guide to decide if polycarbonate is the right match for your lenses, or if you want to spend the extra money on trivex lenses.

While we do not currently stock polycarbonate or trivex lenses, you can find a range of excellent lens choices for prescription eyeglasses when purchasing online with us.

Still unsure and need more information to make your lens material choice? Our optician is always available to help!

What is hyperopia?

What is Hyperopia?

What does hyperopia mean? | What does hyperopia look like? | What causes hyperopia, and what are the symptoms? | How to correct hyperopia | Conclusion

Hyperopia is better known as farsightedness. Learn all about the condition, its causes, symptoms and treatments in this article.

At any stage in life, you can develop refractive errors that blur or distort your eyesight. One of these eye conditions is farsightedness, otherwise known as hyperopia. So, what is hyperopia exactly? 

If your eyes find it hard to focus and you do not see nearby objects clearly, you likely have hyperopia. You can use prescription eyewear to comfortably correct hyperopia and regain clarity when reading a book or taking a photo. 

Let’s have a look at what it means to have hyperopia.

What does hyperopia mean?

Hyperopia is a common eye condition where you can see distant objects clearly but may find nearby objects blurry. In short, your eyes focus on distant objects better than on nearby ones. Sometimes, hyperopia is also referred to as hypermetropia.

So, are hyperopia and farsightedness the same? Yes, you can say hyperopia to refer to someone who is farsighted rather than nearsighted.

However, do not confuse hyperopia with presbyopia, which causes blurry vision while looking at nearby objects. 

Presbyopia is the condition where nearby objects appear blurry, even with glasses. It usually develops around the age of 40 and progresses through the age of 60. To help with presbyopia,  people use reading glasses or eventually upgrade to more corrective multifocal lenses.

DID YOU KNOW?

Approximately 14 million people in the United States have hyperopia.

What does hyperopia look like?

See the image below to visualize  what it looks like to have hyperopia (farsightedness) compared to ‘normal’ vision:

This problem occurs when rays of light enter your eye and focus behind the retina rather than on it. A hyperopic patient’s eyeball is shorter than average. In fact, many children are born hyperopic but outgrow the condition as their eyeballs grow.

What causes hyperopia, and what are the symptoms?

Hyperopia stems from a refractive error that occurs when your cornea or lens isn’t evenly curved. This leads to improper refraction of light rays.

Causes of hyperopia

Your eye has two parts that focus on images.

  1. The cornea is the clear, dome-shaped tissue that forms the front of the eye. It acts as a window and allows light to enter the eye. It helps your eye process light rays to allow you to see words and images.
  2. The lens is a transparent and flexible tissue found directly behind the iris and pupil. It helps focus light and images on your retina.

In an eye without refractive error, these eye parts have flawlessly smooth curvatures. All incoming light is refracted (or bent) by the cornea and lens, which creates a tightly focused image on the retina at the rear of the eye.

Light rays aren’t correctly refracted if your cornea or lens isn’t bent evenly, which results in a refractive error. When your eye is shorter or your cornea is not curved enough, it creates hazy near vision, which is known as hyperopia or farsightedness.

For example, astigmatism is a refractive error that happens when your cornea or lens is bent more sharply in one direction. When left unchecked, this causes blurry vision.

Symptoms of hyperopia 

The initial signs of farsightedness are:

  • Nearby objects may appear blurry
  • Difficulty concentrating or focusing on nearby objects, which may cause squinting
  • Eye strain or fatigue when working on something in close range. You may also feel burning eyes and aching around the eyes

When to see a doctor

Adults

Getting an eye exam every year, from the age of 40, can help prevent or determine the risk of eye conditions such as glaucoma.

If you don’t wear prescription glasses or contact lenses, and are at low risk of eye diseases or present no eye troubles, then you should still consider routine eye tests.

In general,  you should follow this exam schedule:

  • An initial exam at the age of 40
  • Between 40-54, every 2-4 years
  • Between 55-64, every 1-3 years
  • 65 onwards, every 1-2 years

If you have eye-related health conditions like diabetes or wear glasses regularly, then consult your optician or eye doctor for regular appointments.

Children

Ideally, children should be screened for eye diseases or vision correction by a pediatrician, optometrist, or trained screener with the following schedule:

  1. Starting at 6 months
  2. An eye test at 3 years
  3. Before 1st grade and every 2 years during school years

If hyperopia isn’t treated, some children may face problems such as the lazy eye (amblyopia), crossed eyes (strabismus), development delays, and learning difficulties.

How to correct hyperopia

There are three main corrections to help with hyperopia:

  1. Prescription glasses
  2. Contact lenses
  3. LASIK surgery

Typically, you only need to wear prescription eyeglasses for activities with close-up objects such as reading a book or using the computer. Farsightedness prescriptions are indicated with a plus sign before the corrective value.

High-index aspheric lenses are an excellent option for stronger prescriptions. They can reduce thickness in the center of the lens, which is typical for higher hyperopic prescriptions. This will make the lenses more appealing and lighter.

For the most comfortable, clear vision, we recommend opting for high-performance Arise HD Clarity lenses. For children, we recommend polycarbonate lenses that are highly durable, lightweight, and impact resistant.

Refractive surgeries such as Lasik help correct hyperopia and reduce or eliminate the need to wear prescription eyeglasses. The surgery may implicate certain side effects, so always consult an eye doctor first.

Conclusion

If you find it difficult to see up close but the objects in the distance are crystal clear, then you may have hyperopia (farsightedness).

An activity as simple as reading a book might be difficult, as your vision finds it hard to focus on the words right in front of you. Untreated hyperopia can cause eye strain, headaches,  and eye conditions such as strabismus.

Luckily, you can easily use Prescription glasses or contact lenses to correct farsightedness with any low or high prescription. For a more permanent solution, you can also consider LASIK surgery after a consultation with your eye doctor.

At SmartyBuyGlasses, you can find a range of prescription glasses and contact lenses that can meet any prescription, from single vision to progressive lenses. We are here to help you correct hyperopia through quality eyeglasses and sunglasses with endless styles and colours.

Parts of Glasses: All You Need to Know

Parts Of Glasses: All You Need To Know

What are the parts of glasses called? | Frame | Rim | Bridge | Top bar or brow bar or sweat bar | Nose pads | Pad arms | End pieces | Hinges | Screws | Temples or arms

How many of the 11 different parts that makeup glasses can you name? By the end of this article, you'll know them all.

Did you know that glasses are not just lenses and frames? Many other subparts make up the structure of spectacles, and they all have a name and a specific function.

Vision is an aspect of our life that we often take for granted. For many of us, it’s only when we are told that we require vision correction that we realize how much vision improves our quality of life every day.

Seeing that they are such fragile objects, we need to know the parts of eyeglasses so that if ever the need be, we are empowered to explain our requirements to an optical professional, or we can look for replacement glasses parts by ourselves at a store.

What are the parts of glasses called?

Essentially, any pair of eyeglasses has three parts: the front of the frame and the two arms,  known as temples. Each of these has its subparts depending on the design and materials used. The subparts are all indicated in the labeled picture here and then explained in the list below.

DID YOU KNOW?

Half rim andrimless glasses often have a nylon rope that holds thelenses in place.

  • Frame

By frame, it’s meant everything that surrounds the lenses. It is the structure of the glasses. Frames can be made of many materials, such as plastic, acetatemetal, wood, and other eco-friendly materials. They can also have different shapes and features, and they have many separate parts with specific names.

  • Rim

Glasses can have full-rimsemi-rim, or rimless frames. The rim is the front part of the frame, which holds the lenses. It is the part of the glasses that gives them their characteristic style.

  • Bridge

It bridges the two lenses over your nose and holds most of the weight of your glasses. It’s a determining factor for how well the glasses will fit your face. Indeed, bridges vary by style to suit different face shapes.

  • Top bar or brow bar or sweat bar

Some glasses have a top bar placed just above the bridge between the lenses. Its purpose is either to make the frame more sturdy or to add a fashion detail. For example, most pilot models have a top bar. This piece can also be known as a double bridge.

  • Nose pads

These refer to the small oval pads that rest on your nose for a perfect fit and to prevent the glasses from slipping down. Nose pads can be set up in two ways:

Full-rim nose pads: in this case, the nose pads are sculpted as part of the frame front. They’re polished to not be rough on your nose. Acetate or Plastic frames most often have sculpted nose pads which are a part of the frame front.

Push-in nose pads: in this case, the nose pads are attached to the rim. They are usually made of soft clear plastic. The bigger the pad, the more visible it is, and the lesser it is likely to “dig” into the skin. Metal frames have small bars that hold soft plastic nose pads that are adjustable. You can opt for adjustable nose pads for the best comfort.

  • Pad arms

These small pieces (“arms”) attach the nose pads to the rim. They can be adjustable so you can find the best fit, and they are mainly built on metal frames.

  • End pieces

The end pieces are found at the top outer corners of the rim. They connect the hinges to the temples and can be decorated to insert fashion details into the frame.

  • Hinges

The hinges are the metal joints of your glasses, held together by screws or sometimes by intricate metal joins. They connect the end pieces (or frame front, as not all frames have end pieces) to the temples. Thanks to the hinges, you can easily fold and move the temples. There’s a variety of hinges available which are secured in different ways, such as spring hinges.

  • Screws

The screws are the parts of glasses that are easier to replace if broken or lost. They hold together the two halves of a hinge and can be tightened or loosened with a little screwdriver. Most glasses repair kits include screws and a screwdriver specifically made for them.

  • Temples or arms

Temples are the “arms” of your frames and are located on the sides of your head, sitting on your ears. Their core function is to keep your glasses secure as you go through the day wearing them. Temples can be of the following types:

Paddle or blade or straight temple: it’s a temple without a bend to it and is, therefore, completely straight.

Curl sides: also known as cable temples and typically found in metal frames, the part of the temple close to the ear curls at the ends for a comfortable fit.

Drop or hockey end or swan neck: it is the most common design found in modern eyeglass frames. These frames bend downward to create a secure fit behind your ears.

  • Temple tips

The temple tips are placed at the end of the temples. They are made from a different and more comfortable material because they aim to protect the skin behind your ear from irritation.

  • Lenses

Lenses are the most crucial part of your prescription glasses. They’re chosen according to the prescription details from your optometrist for correcting your vision problems (like astigmatism, myopia, and hyperopia).

Lenses can be made of various materials and then customized with many different coatings, such as anti-scratch, anti-fog, and anti-glare, and add-ons like transitions, polarization,  zFORT® blue block, tinting, and mirror.

According to your prescription and needs, your optician will point you in the right direction regarding which lenses to choose.